Lodwar high are KCSE champions

Christopher Namoyo, 18-years old(in blue T-shirt), who scored a straight A of 84 points, celebrates with his Lodwar High School colleagues after the announcement of KCSE results on 3 March. PHOTO:
ROBERT KARIUKI
Christopher Namoyo, 18-years old(in blue T-shirt), who scored a straight A of 84 points, celebrates with his Lodwar High School colleagues after the announcement of KCSE results on 3 March. PHOTO: ROBERT KARIUKI

Christopher Namoyo, 18-years old(in blue T-shirt), who scored a straight A of 84 points, celebrates with his Lodwar High School colleagues after the announcement of KCSE results on 3 March. PHOTO:
ROBERT KARIUKI

BY ROBERT KARIUKI LODWAR, TURKANA CENTRAL

According to Lodwar high school principal Patrick Lokwayen, discipline, personal initiative and strong bond between teachers, students and the support staff contributed to the excellent performance
“The results were better as compared to the previous year. This time we attained a mean score of 7.96 as compared to last year’s 7.5. We greatly attribute our success to hard work and discipline.”

Lodwar high school has become the new academic giant in Turkana County according to the just released
Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) results. Lodwar high beat Turkana girls’ to claim the top slot after it produced a student who scored grade A with 84 points- the maximum one can achieve in the test.
Elijah Leteo and Christopher Namoyo both from Lodwar high scored 84 points and 83 points respectively. These were the only A grades in the county. The national school registered the third highest number of candidates with an entry of 174 after Kakuma refugee institution (316) and St. Kevin’s secondary (227) yet all examined candidates managed to scored grade D+ and above with no one having irregularities or missing his results. 138 out of the total 174 candidates who sat for the exams in the school qualify to join universities and others tertiary institutions.
The 2014 results also showed boys performed better than girls. In 2013, girls performed better than boys.
But the results for private schools in Turkana were not impressive. This is attributed to the many challenges adult or private learners are going through such as inadequate facilities and a balance between work, family and school life, which makes it difficult to focus on studies. A total of 2,382 candidates were registered from both public secondary schools and private institutions. Majority of them especially from private schools scored grade D+ and D.
According to Lodwar high school principal Patrick Lokwayen, discipline, personal initiative and strong bond between teachers, students and the support staff contributed to the excellent performance “The results were better as compared to the previous year. This time we attained a mean score of 7.96 as compared to last year’s 7.5. We greatly attribute our success to hard work and discipline,” Mr. Lokwayen explained.

Triumphant amid intense challenges
Success does not come on a silver platter. It is a combination of values and traits. The challenges do not matter but how you overcome them hugely matters. Lodwar high school is not an exception.
Mr. Lokwayen, the school principal cited the biggest challenge being fees

Mr. Patrick Lokwayen, Principal, Lodwar Boys High School(left) and teachers join students in celebrating the school’s good performance in 2014 KCSE. PHOTO: ROBERT KARIUKI

Mr. Patrick Lokwayen, Principal, Lodwar Boys High School(left) and teachers join students in celebrating the school’s good performance in 2014 KCSE.
PHOTO: ROBERT KARIUKI

“Many of these students come from underprivileged families so they can’t raise full school fees. At the end of the year we remain with   lot of arrears thus we lack resources to propel activities in the school and also one of our laboratories was burnt down which makes it  difficult for students  to     

 do their practicals,”

arrears from students who come from poor families. Fees arrears have paralysed some activities in the school.
The school also lacks enough laboratories after one of them got burnt.

“Many of these students come from under-privileged families so they can’t raise full school fees. At the end of the year we remain with a lot of arrears thus we lack resources to propel activities in the school and also one of our laboratories was burnt down which makes it difficult for students to do their practicals,”he said.

“Another big challenge is inadequate supply of water. This is affecting the timeline when it comes to implementing school programmes. More time is spent searching for water, reducing the amount of study time. Water is supplied to us by Lodwar Water and Sewerage Company (LOWASCO), but the supply is erratic,” he concluded.
But despite these challenges, the boys were still able to excel.






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